Equal Rights Party (Loco-Focos)

The immediate cause of all the mischief of misrule is, that the men and women acting as the representatives of the people have a private and sinister interest, producing a constant sacrifice of the interest of the people. William Leggett

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Location: United States

In my damned beloved universe I would like to be a lonely weed, but not a delicate Narcissus kissing his own mug in the mirror. I would like to be any of God’s creatures right down to the last mangy hyena--but never a tyrant or even the cat of a tyrant. I would not like to be in the elite, nor, of course, in the cowardly herd, nor be a guard dog of that herd, nor a shepherd, sheltered by that herd. And I would like happiness, but not at the expense of the unhappy, and I would like freedom, but not at the expense of the unfree. Yevgenii Yevtushenko

Tuesday, September 06, 2005

Loco-Focos

Loco-Focos is a name given in derision to the members of a faction that split off from the Democratic party in New York in 1835. Tension had been growing between radical Democrats, who believed that Andrew Jackson's war against the national bank should be extended to state banks and other monopolies, and the regular Tammany Democrats in New York City. When the Tammany leaders expelled (Sept., 1835) William Leggett, the radical editor of the New York Evening Post, from the party, the radicals decided to act. At a Tammany Hall meeting held on Oct. 29, 1835, to ratify the Tammany nominations, the revolt began. The antibank men voted down the chairman selected by the organization; before the meeting could be reorganized, the gas was turned off and the hall plunged in darkness. The reformers, however, continued their work by the light of candles and of self-igniting “locofoco” matches, from which their nickname derived. In Jan., 1836, this group organized a new party, called the Friends of Equal Rights or the Equal Rights party.

By the glint of my computer screen, I again call upon all people who believe in the doctrine, from beginning to end, of equal rights—equal human rights to liberty and property. Today's electoral monarchies (who keep getting reelected with monies donated by their masters to which they are beholden) do not support equal rights, because such rights impair their privileged position. As a result, we THE PEOPLE are the less for it; Katrina has visibly demonstrated the chasm between the monarchs and the People.

3 Comments:

Blogger markfield22 said...

Can't wait for your next blog....


Todays inspirational quote:

"The price of success is hard work, dedication to the job at hand, and the determination that whether we win or lose, we have applied the best of ourselves to the task at hand"

(Vince Lombardi )

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2:22 PM  
Blogger Ken said...

Interesting blog you have here, I have added it to my list and will check in often!

Best Wishes,
Ken
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2:37 PM  
Blogger Gonzalo Vergara said...

Thank you Mark

1:53 PM  

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